Cleaning up a crude .stl model of an O2 to hopefully produce a good model of an O2

Grim.Black

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Feb 15, 2022
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Obviously the goal here is to produce a fully functional set of full sized plastics, but it will also be cool to release miniatures was well, besides I already have this little model up my sleeve!



It will be awesome to add a complete O2 to it!
Are the STL or 3D files of the Indy skins available? I'd love to make a Raspberry Pi sized version. That's my plan for the O2 files as well. I'd love to have an O2 sitting on my desk again.
 
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Irinikus

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The Indy case is a model that I scratch built, so there's no STL file freely available for it. Once I've managed to 3D print it to properly verify it, I will allow it to be hosted on an FTP, but definitely not in an STL format, as the STL format sucks, the O2.STL clearly shows this!
 

Grim.Black

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The Indy case is a model that I scratch built, so there's no STL file freely available for it. Once I've managed to 3D print it to properly verify it, I will allow it to be hosted on an FTP, but definitely not in an STL format, as the STL format sucks, the O2.STL clearly shows this!
STL of simple models are fine but for complex, multi-part designs it falls flat. The O2 model looks like someone took a Solidworks file and converted it straight to STL. That's why we can't grab and manipulate the individual parts. If the original file was available we could then export each component separately and possibly have a higher quality model.
 

flexion

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I tried to see how a miniature 3d print would look like, but the unmodified original STL has way too many 'open vertices' errors to print it properly. It's full of holes on the outside. So the skin has to be reworked anyways, even for a miniature version like an rpi enclosure or SD card holder. Thanks Irinikus for working on this! really cool!
 

Irinikus

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I tried to see how a miniature 3d print would look like, but the unmodified original STL has way too many 'open vertices' errors to print it properly. It's full of holes on the outside. So the skin has to be reworked anyways, even for a miniature version like an rpi enclosure or SD card holder. Thanks Irinikus for working on this! really cool!
Besides increasing the models fidelity, that's one of the aspects I'm working on!

Not too difficult to fix, but it just takes time!
 
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Grim.Black

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I tried to see how a miniature 3d print would look like, but the unmodified original STL has way too many 'open vertices' errors to print it properly. It's full of holes on the outside. So the skin has to be reworked anyways, even for a miniature version like an rpi enclosure or SD card holder. Thanks Irinikus for working on this! really cool!
The single model file is comprised of multiple individual parts that were converted from their original format directly to the STL. Each part, as a mesh, shouldn't touch each other. This was very easy to see when I cleaning up the model for the tophat. There was a very small gap between the tophat and the main body which made clearing away unnecessary fairly easy . If you were to print the file even without the open vertices it would be a hot mess, but you already figured that out. If we had the original file, we likely could pick and export each component separately.

I've picked my way thru the model and closed all the open holes. The model isn't perfect but after pealing away all different parts I have a feeling I know where it came from. What convinced me was working the buttons in the skirt.

1645195156125.png
 

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Irinikus

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Looks great. Did you have to clean up the vertices by hand or is it something that Blender can do?
It’s all done by hand! One vertex at a time. The .stl model’s a mess, lots of holes and poorly merged sections. So it takes quite a bit of time and a fair bit of imagination realign things “properly”!

Once it’s fully converted to quads. I’m still going to have to spend a fair amount of time making sure that the geometry of the surfaces is as properly aligned and as smooth as possible. (This process is going to be painful!)

it may also need a few progressive 3D prints with adjustments to make sure things are as they need to be. It looks fairly decent in the viewport, but small indentations would only truly be picked up with a physical 3D print.
 
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Grim.Black

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Feb 15, 2022
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It’s all done by hand! One vertex at a time. The .stl model’s a mess, lots of holes and poorly merged sections. So it takes quite a bit of time and a fair bit of imagination realign things “properly”!

Once it’s fully converted to quads. I’m still going to have to spend a fair amount of time making sure that the geometry of the surfaces is as properly aligned and as smooth as possible. (This process is going to be painful!)

it may also need a few progressive 3D prints with adjustments to make sure things are as they need to be. It looks fairly decent in the viewport, but small indentations would only truly be picked up with a physical 3D print.
Maybe this will help. I've already separated the parts and filled the holes. A few more might pop up when you import the file but at least the individual parts are now separated.
 

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Grim.Black

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I now know where this .stl originally came from!!! (The Chrome skins Demo!!!)

I was hoping that the Inventor .iv file would be of a high fidelity, but alas!!!







It's too bad the file didn't include the metal chassis. It would at least help point me in the right direction for a Raspberry Pi enclosure.
 

Irinikus

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@Shiunbird, to answer the question that you asked me in the Youtube comments, as to whether you could use Quad Remesher only on a selection of vertices to save time.

I selected the following vertices on the front face of the model and applied Quad Remesher:



Here's the result:



The whole model was still converted to quads, and I left it with default settings to show you how much of the geometric information is lost with the lower default settings!

A high density mesh, "one with a high vertex count", is extremely difficult to work with by hand.

Even with the high vertex count like that which I demonstrated in the video, there is still a large loss geometric information across the surfaces, which will take forever to sort out through manual editing, so in essence, it will actually take more time to properly sort out!
 
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